Flickr Widget

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Finn Juhl

I started this blog September 6, 2010. Some of you have been readers since the beginning. Others have come on board later. From now through the end of the month, I'm going to be on a short blogging break. Not only am I in the middle of a big volunteer project, I'm also trying to help get the new store open, so I've decided share some of my favorite posts from the past four years. I'll throw in a few new photos for you longtime supporters who read the posts when they were first published.


(First posted 12/3/2010)

Finn Juhl (1912-1989) was born in Copenhagen and studied under Kaare Klint at the Royal Academy of Arts, where he graduated in 1934. Afterwards he took a job with the architect Vilhelm Lauritzen. The house he designed for himself during this period was widely acclaimed, but Juhl was principally becoming known as a furniture designer and is credited with pioneering the use of teak in furniture design.

Juhl began a longstanding collaboration with the cabinetmaker Neils Vodder in the late 1930s. Their pieces were frequently shown at the annual exhibitions of the Danish Cabinetmakers' Guild. His early chairs were handmade in small quantities, featuring the floating backs and seats which came to characterize his work and to emphasize its sculptural quality. Unlike his contemporaries, Juhl placed more value on form and less on function, a serious break with the Klint School.

Edgar Kaufmann Jr., whose father had commissioned Fallingwater from Frank Lloyd Wright, introduced Juhl´s work to America. By the early 1950´s Juhl, who had opened his own office, was designing a furniture collection for Baker, and an exhibit for the "Good Design" show in Chicago. He was also selected to design the Trusteeship Council Chamber for United Nations headquarters in New York.

Among Juhl´s notable designs are the Pelican chair (1940), Chieftain armchair (1949) and the Bwana chair and ottoman (1962). Juhl´s work won gold medals at several Milan Triennale, and was exhibited across Europe and the United States.

From lostcityarts.com and danish-furniture.com




Chieftain chair, 1949
danish-furniture.com

Rare double Chieftain chair, 1949
1stdibs.com

Pelican chair
finnjuhl.com

Bwana chair
treadwaygallery.com

44 chair
artdesigncafe.com

48 chair
1stdibs.com

53 chair
1stdibs.com

Poet sofa,
danish-furniture.com

Teak bowl
1stdibs.com

Table lamp
wright20.com

Teak desk
editoratlarge.com

Friday, October 24, 2014

Nanna Ditzel

I started this blog September 6, 2010. Some of you have been readers since the beginning. Others have come on board later. From now through the end of the month, I'm going to be on a short blogging break. Not only am I in the middle of a big volunteer project, I'm also trying to help get the new store open, so I've decided share some of my favorite posts from the past four years. I'll throw in a few new photos for you longtime supporters who read the posts when they were first published.


(First posted 6/17/2011)

Nanna Ditzel (1923-2005) was born in Copenhagen. Originally trained as a cabinetmaker, she later studied at the School of Arts and Crafts and the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen, graduating with a degree in furniture design in 1946. In that same year, she established a design studio with her husband Jørgen Ditzel and worked with him until his untimely death in 1961.

Throughout her career, which spanned almost six decades, she experimented with new materials such as foam rubber, fiberglass and wicker. She worked in many disciplines, designing furniture, jewelry, tableware and textiles and continued to create furniture and jewelry up to the end of her life. Much is still in production.

In 1968 she moved to London, where she and husband Kurt Heide opened the international furniture house Interspace in Hampstead. In 1986 she moved back to Denmark and opened her own studio.

She was exhibited internationally with one-woman shows in Amsterdam, Berlin, New York, Vienna, London, Stockholm, Milan, Glasgow, Manchester, Reykjavik, Paris and nationally in Denmark. During her lifetime, she was awarded many international prizes for her awards, including many medals from the Triennale in Milan and the prestigious Lunning Prize and is remembered as "The First Lady of Scandinavian Design." 

From nanna-ditzel-design.dk and furnituredesign24.com


Sausage chairs
1stdibs.com

Child's high chair
1stdibs.com

Oda armchair
pinterest.com - Ursela Maätita

Hanging Egg wicker chair
nanna-ditzel-design.dk

Swivel Easy chair
houzz.com

Skal chair
furnituredesign24.com

Settee, chairs and table
bolighuset-ry.dk

Trinidad chair
arttattler.com

Dennie chair
houzz.com

Child's Toadstool
arttattler.com

Silver bracelet, 1951
nanna-ditzel-design.dk

Wristwatch for Georg Jensen, 1995
nanna-ditzel-design.dk

Young Nanna Ditzel
retrostudio-online.com


Here's a delightful interview with Nanna Ditzel in 2005, shortly before her death. She discusses the Trinidad chair, designed in 1993, one of her award-winning pieces. The clip also includes production of a Trinidad chair.


youtube.com
Uploaded by fredericiafurniture, March 22, 2010